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Christians at Mecca Augustus Ralli

Christians at Mecca

Augustus Ralli

Published May 21st 2012
ISBN : 9781151969149
Paperback
120 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 Excerpt: ...its part. If it did not buy theMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 Excerpt: ...its part. If it did not buy the consciences of the Ulemas, it at least moderated their fanaticism. The Fettoua was written on a long roll of thick glazed paper, and it concluded thus: --When a Mussulman people whose country has been invaded by infidels, has fought them as long as there is hope of driving them out, and when it is certain that the continuance of war can only bring misery, ruin, and death for the Mussulmans, with no chance of conquering the infidels--this people, while cherishing the hope of shaking off the yoke with the help of God, may elect to live under their rule, on the express condition that they may retain the free practice of their religion, and that their wives and daughters will be respected. Roches was informed that this document would have a tenfold greater influence if approved by the Ulemas of the great Universities of the East. It was the first premonition of his journey to Mecca. From Kairouan he proceeded to Malta. There he met Prosper Merimee, and to this meeting he ultimately owed his salvation. Merimde gave him a letter of introduction to his cousin Fulgence Fresnel, French Consul at Jeddah, but then at Cairo. Fresnel was a great Orientalist of the school of Sylvestre de Sacy, the most consummate master of the Arabic language and literature of his own or perhaps any age. His books written in Arabic had been adopted in the most celebrated Eastern Universities. He had devoted forty years, he said, to the study, and it would require another forty to attain perfect knowledge: that is, the power of assimilating at first sight the works of poets and writers of all times. Fresnel had been one of his most distinguished pupils- but for the present purpose it is more important to record that he was a close and beloved fr...